Monday, February 14, 2011

Chapter 9 (pages 113-5): Last decisions

What had the Nazis decided to do with the prisoners at Buchenwald? How effective was the plan?

12 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Nazis planned to liquidate the Benchenwald camp. They wanted all of the prisoners to be killed and intended blow up the camp afterward. At first, the Nazis seemed to be successful in accomplishing their goal. They discontinued distributing food to the prisoners, and a few thousand prisoners were evacuated every day. But when twenty thousand prisoners remained, there was an alert that sent them back to their blocks to be evacuated the next day. The prisoners believed that everything would return to normal the next day and they would be killed. However, the Nazis’ plan came crashing down when the resistance movement decided to take action with their gunshots and grenades. The resistance movement caused the SS to flee from the camp. The prisoners were then freed by the American army.
    -Nancy N.

    ReplyDelete
  3. As Nancy said, They planned to evacuate the prisoners, then blow up the camp, and hopefully a few enemies along with it. They cut off the food supply and began the process of transporting the prisoners somewhere else. But before they could evacuate all of the prisoners, there was an alert that sent the remaining prisoners, including Elie, back to their blocks. The day after, resistance forces took action, and the camp was liberated. Elie survived his experience, though it haunts him to this day. It's sad, because his father missed liberation by just a short time. The Nazi's plan would have worked if it wasn't for those meddling Allies, but it didn't.

    ReplyDelete
  4. As the end of the concentration camps came nearer Hitler knew something must be done with the Jews. As they were waiting for an SS officer to come and count them they were told to move to Appelplatz. On the way there Elie heard that the Germans were planning to finish off the prisoners by shooting them. Then they found out prisoners in Buchenwald were to be liquidated. Eventually they decided to evacuate the whole camp at once then blow it up. As they were getting ready the sirens went off and the evacuation was postponed. The next day as they were getting ready to leave the first American tank stood at the gates and the SS officers had fled from the scene.

    ReplyDelete
  5. On April 10 20,000 people remaining the Nazis decide to kill all. The air raid sirenres sound and they send everyone indoors. They leave the people there for hours and on April 11 the American soilders come in the Buchenwald camp and get free. Everybody now thinks on freedom themselves. The Nazi plan got ruined by the soliders that liberated the 20,000 remaining Jews.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hitler has finally kept his promise, yelled many of the prisoners as they were being hauled away to somewhere else. The SS men had a plan to "liquidate" the camp and then afterwards blow the whole thing into smithereens. Thousands had already been transported and thousands more were waiting for their own chance to meet their maker. Everything was going as planned until the ailed forces barged their gigantic heads into others affairs. They were going to liquidate them from the camps and from their mere existences. No more hungry stomachs to feed. No more cry babies whining about their bodies hurting. All of the problems in the world would be gone. All hate would leave with them. All stinginess would dissapear with them. All would be at peace. Well, we'll get them next time.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Well they want to kill the prisoners and blow up the camp with all the evidence of the crimes they commited against all the people. The plan seemed very effective at first. But what failed in this plan was that the allies closed in to fast. So the germans didnt have engouh time to do the plan and failed. Also they would have had less troubles and less thought to think off. i think the plan would have been amazing for the germans if had work and the time wouldnt had run out.

    ReplyDelete
  8. It was a ticking clock that the germans were working to slow with, they had to evacuate all the jews and blow up the camp all before the allies could ruin it, but they were just to slow. I would think it would be smarter to just leave the jews there and when the american army showed up close to them, then blow it up, using the hews as bait. Not that i think its right, but it would knock out two birds with one stone, kill some american soldiers, and finish off the jews they still had. At least they would have had that accomplishment. Though the not happy, but better ending happened, and some jews were saved, but Elie's father, so close to making it to freedom, passed away. Though through that darkness came the light, but the darkness will never leave the minds of the victims.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The nazzis planned to kill all the Jews before the allies came, but it didn't work this way. Ellie and his father marched the "death march" in the freezing cold weather, they didn't stay in the concentration camp because they believed the Nazzis were going to kill everyone in the campo so they decided to take a risk in getting a chance to live and the walked the death march. In this part is where Elies father dies, he would have probably survived if they stayed but it still would have been hard. Ellie faced reality and kept on walking. this part is very hard to imagine how thousands of jews were just thrown outside just like animals to walk till they can not anymore and break down and die. it's very hard to believe this happened but it did.

    ReplyDelete
  10. The corpse staring in the mirror is Elie Wiesel. This tells me that there is no recognition within him between life and death. He is so weak and frail that the person staring back in the mirror is only a shadow of the person he used to be. Death was such a large part of his life for such an extended period of time that it left its imprint on his soul, mind and body . In a way I don’t think he realized just how weak and thin he had become, he was strong enough to survive ; indestructible.
    The eyes that looked in the mirror were haunted. After witnessing atrocities being committed to his people, after being a silent watcher to the death of his family, friends and strangers the look in his eyes could not just stay the same. The look as he registered himself will never leave him because he saw the person he had become and because he had changed so drastically.
    I think Elie was feeling scared and surprised. To see his body in such a state and to see the look on his eyes and the pitiable state he was in surely stayed with him forever. Another thing I know I would be feeling is anger. How could people just stand by and watch as this was done to me? Why didn’t they fight for us when we couldn’t? I’d be angry at the people who did that to me and possibly angry at myself for just going along with it. Finally I think he was feeling sadness and guilt at the thought that he was the only one to survive of his family.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Although for many prisoners liberation or family no longer mattered to them, the Nazis planned to obliterate all of them before the liberation countries came. “Everyday, a few thousand inmates passed the camp’s gate and did not return (Wiesel 114).” The Nazis plan almost came to be completed, except that the liberating countries came sooner than expected, which caused the Nazis to shut down Buchenwald so unexpectedly. Their plan was effective because they did manage to take so many souls, but just like Alex wrote previously, it would have been more effective if they had more time on their side. But no matter who it is, time is something that is on not on anyone’s side. Also, responding back to Daniella's comment, I do not think that Elie's father died mainly from the march between camp. I think that he died for many reasons. Some possibly being exhaustion, starvation, and dysentery. Dysentery is a digestion infection that can dehydrate a person really quickly. It was also common throughout camp concentrations and describes the symptoms that Elie's father had. Nonetheless, it was a depressing end for someone.
    -Lilly

    ReplyDelete
  12. Their plan was to obliterate and destroy everyone in the Buchenwald Camp before the liberation countries appeared at their doorstep. They discontinued the food and supplies to them hoping they would die quicker. They evacuated them by the thousands every day. Then they planned to explode the entire camp, and hoped they would have killed a few enemies in the process. When a certain number of people were left they called them back to their blocks with an alarm. Every one thought they were going to be gone the next day. Their plan was succeeding for a long time until the liberating countries returned unexpectedly. They were caught off guard and were forced to close the camps. Every one who was left was set free by the opposing army. Their plan might have been more effective if they had a lot more time. They did not think that they might come any earlier than what was expected.

    ReplyDelete